April 2, 2010

Friday chess tactic

Originally posted here: Friday chess tactic

6 comments:

 
author Anonymous
authorUrl 
adminClass blog-admin pid-1266765523
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Anonymous said...

hello,

I noticed your blog with so many chessgames posted.

Just wanted to suggest this alternative tool to your java applet for displaying chess games:

http://pgn4web.casaschi.net/board-generator.html

pgn4web

 
author Nikolai Pilafov
authorUrl https://www.blogger.com/profile/00695284688005658187
adminClass blog-admin pid-8567400
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Nikolai Pilafov said...

Hi pgn4web (?!),
I’m not sure if my visitors will benefit from an anonymous recommendation but I hope somebody is willing to try out your method.
As far as I can see your PGN support is rather limited. Are you aware that IFRAME usage is strongly discouraged by the latest Web standards? In any case, parting with their PGN data is not what I recommend to my visitors. I believe that PGN source belongs and should stay inside the posting body where users will have full control over it.

 
author Anonymous
authorUrl 
adminClass blog-admin pid-2024236908
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Anonymous said...

Suit yourself.

I just wanted to offer an alternative to the java applet you are using today.

IFRAMEs are sometimes discouraged if you dont keep control over the iframe content; if this is a concern for you, you could easily deploy the pgn4web tool on your own server and refer the iframe to yuor site in total safety.
Not much different than what you are doing already loading javascript code from a third party site you probably control or trust (http://chesstuff.googlecode.com/svn).

That (implementing a copy of the pgn4web software on your site) would give you full control on how your PGN data is used.

But again, this was just a suggestion, if you dont like it then no big deal.

PS: about the anonymity... I'm the author of pgn4web, everything in http://pgn4web.casaschi.net points to me... I just dont like the idea to share my google id or email on every blog I comment on... Each of us can be paranoid on what the (dis)like better :-)

 
author Nikolai Pilafov
authorUrl https://www.blogger.com/profile/00695284688005658187
adminClass blog-admin pid-8567400
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Nikolai Pilafov said...

No problem, Mr. pgn4web
Having more choices will definitely help users and your suggestion is welcome.
In the end, everybody is free to make their decision as a matter of taste or as a result of careful evaluation.

To further help the latter I raised few questions above which should be of concern in many situations. I’m surprised that you take the IFRAME issue so lightly. I don’t see how you can compare external SCRIPTs to external IFRAMEs. They have very little in common. There’s no reason to discuss it here but those who’re interested can easily research it better.

You even suggest using IFRAME to those who have their own self-built sites. The only way this makes sense to me is if you rely on IFRAME to provide language isolation for your JavaScript code. If so, users should know that this is one of the widely criticized usages of IFRAME.

Here is a quick and easy to understand example. If you visit my Archive: April 2009 page you will see how 40 instances of CVD peacefully coexist and share resources from the same JVM. Producing the same with your approach will be very problematic (to say the least). If you manage, please, give us a link where we can take a look. If it works, I’d be curious about RAM, CPU usage and cross browser problems.

Accept my apology if you’ve already tested those scenarios.

 
author Anonymous
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adminClass blog-admin pid-1015855778
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Anonymous said...

Well, it's good to have options, as you say.

For curiosity, I looked at your April archive page, with following results:
- started with a windows hourglass telling me to wait
- google chrome telling me the page was not responding and suggesting me to kill the instance
- the cpu utilization and memory consumption of the java virtual machine going to the roof
- still the windows hourglass telling me to wait

I guess, no matter what the technique, having 40 applets in the same page does not look to me a good idea (what do you want your user to look at? most people never scroll beyond the first screen anyway).

I accept that someone might criticize using IFRAMES, for my part I criticize a page that is crashing my browser :-)

I accept everyone has their own "loves" and "hates", I guess you wont be one of my users.

 
author Nikolai Pilafov
authorUrl https://www.blogger.com/profile/00695284688005658187
adminClass blog-admin pid-8567400
data:comment.favicon 
Nikolai Pilafov said...

Well, well, well!
What do we have here? Seems like some random claims by an Anonymous blogger who doesn’t even sign their name. Maybe I shouldn’t spend my time on it.

I presume it’s still you Mr. pgn4web. If so, your machine might need some cleaning up. For the record, the April’s archive above is from 2009 and, during the year, hundreds of visitors loaded that same page in their browsers. I find it hard to believe that nobody reported any problems with it if they had any. Yes, as we all know, the JVM does take some time to start-up the very first time it gets loaded after reboot. After that you should be fine.

I’m afraid you’ve missed the important point of my previous comment. The archive feature is automatically available in every blogging environment and every publishing method must support it. It’s not an option, it wasn’t my idea, there is nothing special about it and we can’t just ignore it as “rarely used”. Otherwise you’re telling your users something like:
“Yes, my method will work on your blog with the following exception…”

Out of your last comment you don’t appear interested in doing any serious testing with your publishing method. In that case, you shouldn’t worry about loosing me as your user.